What it means to be a Mother?

WLM - Mrs Jenny Bess Hibbett's mother, Annie Cotton Goggins

By JENNY BESS HIBBETT
With TOMI WILEY

To be a Mother is an awesome calling, humbling experience and a prisoner of undying love. As I continue to teach I am acquainted with many mothers. As I become older I see myself becoming more a replica of my mother daily.

Eventually your children will live by your example, and there are no perfect mothers but less than perfect. We try with perseverance to become the best, but I never observed a child wishing for a different mother.

“My mother was the making of me. She was so true, so sure of me, and I felt that I had someone to live for, someone I must not disappoint,” Thomas Edison said.

Mothers must have an amazing attention span to sit through so many, many hours of ball games, piano lessons, scouting, and other numerous classes and meetings with few complaints. She drives 100 times a week to accommodate schedules that would “frustrate any mortal being”. I value the mother who unselfishly helps with homework and who is delighted to see her child do his or her best, who refrains from finding fault with the teachers and has availability for school activities.

Children admire mothers who make the house smell good with cooking. I value today my mother’s old cookbooks. Not only do they provide good recipes but household hints.

Recently, I found old ration stamps for sugar during World War II. Along the pages are precious memories of the endless tasks of preparing food directly from the garden to canning in that hot summer kitchen. Mothers say you can “lick” the bowl after mixing. Nothing ever tasted better since.

I applaud moms who do nice things for dads in word and deed. A Chinese proverb states, “A hundred men may make an encampment, but it takes a woman to make a home.” Forget the housework, remember the husband.

I have admiration for the mothers who teach their children to be 100 percent American. There is no room for 50 percent loyalty. Mothers should pray for our leaders, teach respect for our laws and show awareness for our environment and history. Their children will develop into good citizens.

My mother never had the opportunity to travel, but her knowledge of places was amazing. A book was her companion and entertainment. They opened doors for teaching on all topics and made her a charming conversationalist. Accolades to moms and children visiting the library.

Before my mother’s death in 1985 at 92 years young, I wrote a special piece for her and think of her daily.

To Mama on Mother’s DayWLM - Mrs Jenny Bess Hibbett's mother, Annie Cotton Goggins

Today is a day of tender memories, a day to keep from year to year because of gratitude to you, my Mother.
For each gift you gave along life’s way there is worth.
First for teaching the rewards of work, for to be happy you continue to work, is idleness brings discontent.
Whatever the task, you said, “Do it well.”
Secondly, you gave the friendship of books.
Other gifts may come and go, but the desire to learn captured us as children and has a lasting bond that aspires us to keep aims and interest high.
Above all others, gratitude for leading us to know our Creator.
Setting the example daily in Christian living, concerned for our souls and others and prayer without ceasing has been your formula.
Home is the place Where character is built and God’s love is first shown, therefore,
Thank you for being my mother.

By JENNY BESS HIBBETT

Mrs. Jenny Bess Hibbett was a Kindergarten teacher in the late 1950s before helping start Mt. Juliet Christian Academy in 1961. In 1958 she married N.C. Hibbett, who was the first mayor of Mt. Juliet, where the couple have lived since marriage. Mrs. Hibbett, the third mayor of Mt. Juliet, held the honor of being the first female mayor of City, after serving as a commissioner since 1968. The Hibbetts have three sons – Bobby, Johnny and Tommy – and five grandchildren.

Mrs. Hibbett is still a Pre-K teacher at MJCA and works at the Mt. Juliet Library several days a week. This article was originally published in a Mt. Juliet newspaper in the 1980s and was used by permission and submitted by Mrs. Hibbett.

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